Fichte Reread Wrap-up: We Are the Enemy

Rereading Fichte after having read many more modern compulsory state schooling advocates, one is struck by the constant echoes of him. When, for example, William Torrey Harris recommends dark, ugly schools buildings removed from the delights of nature, the better to train children to focus on their intellectual development, he is merely echoing Fichte’s dismissal … Continue reading “Fichte Reread Wrap-up: We Are the Enemy”

Schooling as State Control: Some More Fichte

As mentioned earlier, I’ve been rereading Fichte’s Addresses to the German Nation, since I now have a lot more historical and philosophical context than I had when I first read them several years ago. What follows are a few quotations that, this time, grabbed my attention, and a little light discussion. For anyone new here: … Continue reading “Schooling as State Control: Some More Fichte”

Fichte and Messianic Schooling

Got another ‘final’ COVID 19 post all cued up, but let’s talk Education History! Decided to reread Fichte’s foundational Addresses to the German Nation which you can find discussed at some length here on this blog. After having finished rereading Parish Schools and more Pestalozzi, it seemed necessary to reread with, one hopes, a deeper … Continue reading “Fichte and Messianic Schooling”

Education Reading Update: Hecker, Schlegel, and Fichte

The rabbit holes are infinite and eternal. Well, maybe not that bad, but, Lord, it isn’t good. Trying to get my head around 19th century American Catholicism, in order to have some feel for how Catholics viewed education. Don’t need to become an expert, just know enough that I don’t make obvious and avoidable errors. … Continue reading “Education Reading Update: Hecker, Schlegel, and Fichte”

Fichte, Part 5: The Wrap-up

Note: I’m reading and posting about Johann Gottlieb Fichte (1762 – 1814) because he is widely recognized as a key figure in modern education. He greatly influenced von Humboldt’s reforms of the German school system, which in turn greatly influenced Horace Mann and that crowd. It’s important, I think, in any discussion of modern education to recognize … Continue reading “Fichte, Part 5: The Wrap-up”

Fichte, Part 4

Note: I’m reading and posting about Johann Gottlieb Fichte (1762 – 1814) because he is widely recognized as a key figure in modern education. He greatly influenced von Humboldt’s reforms of the German school system, which in turn greatly influenced Horace Mann and that crowd. It’s important, I think, in any discussion of modern education to recognize … Continue reading “Fichte, Part 4”

Aside on Fichte, Hegel, and that Crowd

Idle speculation follows. I suppose that around 1800, the idea of inevitable progress driven by forces inexorable, if invisible, could maybe have seemed compelling: – technology was clearly getting better; – religion, in the view of Protestants, was clearly getting better, – government, at least if you weren’t a king of some sort, was sort … Continue reading “Aside on Fichte, Hegel, and that Crowd”

Fichte, Part 3? 4? Where Were We?

Note: I’m reading and posting about Johann Gottlieb Fichte (1762 – 1814) because he is widely recognized as a key figure in modern education. He greatly influenced von Humboldt’s reforms of the German school system, which in turn greatly influenced Horace Mann and that crowd. It’s important, I think, in any discussion of modern education to recognize … Continue reading “Fichte, Part 3? 4? Where Were We?”

Fichte, Part II

Weird, but in the past I’ve found the quote I wanted easily via Google. Here it is, but not with exact line-and-verse citation. I recall that it’s from Addresses to the German Nation, but have not verified yet or exactly where:  “Education should aim at destroying free will so that after pupils are thus schooled … Continue reading “Fichte, Part II”

Fichte, Part I

In a comment to this post on the deep-revolving John C Wright’s blog, I promised to dig up more information on Johann  Fichte, a philosopher bridging Kant and Hegel, and viewed as sort of a transitional figure. He’s quite amazing, really – it’s bracing, to put it one way, to read such ideas stated so … Continue reading “Fichte, Part I”