Testing for Real (yes, the d*mn virus)

Aside: I often think that what I write couldn’t possibly need to be said, that anybody who has enough mental horsepower to read what I’m saying couldn’t possibly have missed the point. But then, it often happens to me that hearing somebody else express what should be common knowledge makes it more clear or vivid to me. I assume this is true for others? Anyway, here goes another post on something I find it hard to believe anyone could miss. But I’m an odd duck, with odd blind spots…

A hundred years ago, medicines didn’t get tested – they got tried out on anyone willing to try them. That’s how people in the 1920’s ended up drinking Radithor. A William J. A. Bailey, a Harvard product (although he did drop out, I’ll give him that) manufactured and sold an elixir of distilled water and radium from 1918 to 1928. His biggest fan, the young billionaire socialite and athlete Eben Byers, died in 1932 from what at the time was diagnosed as radium poisoning, but now would be attributed to cancers caused by radiation. As the Wall Street Journal put it: “The Radium Water Worked Fine Until His Jaw Came Off”.

After that rather gruesome and highly publicized death, the FDA started getting more involved in testing drugs for safety and effectiveness. It took some time to get up to speed. For example, thalidomide was tested in the 1950s and approved for use against a number of diseases, but famously was not tested for effects on unborn children. The result of having it prescribed to pregnant women was over 10,000 thalidomide babies born with severe birth defects.

Thalidomide was introduced in 1956 and was aggressively marketed by the German pharmaceutical company Chemie Grünenthal under the trade name Contergan as a medication for anxietytrouble sleeping, “tension”, and morning sickness.[3][4] It was introduced as a sedative and medication for morning sickness without having been tested on pregnant women.[5] While initially deemed to be safe in pregnancy, concerns regarding birth defects were noted in 1961, and the medication was removed from the market in Europe that year.[3][6]

The Oracle Wikipedia

As a result, in the 1960s another round of tightening of testing requirements went into effect. This process has been refined and tightened ever since. Now, almost 90 years since Radithor, there’s a giant FDA bureaucracy dedicated to making sure any proposed drug goes through a rigorous regimen of testing before being released on the public. In the US, this testing generally lasts about a decade and may cost a $1B.

Super-high level summery: To get FDA approval, a drug must be shown, first, not to excessively harm lab animals; then, to not excessively harm people. It is important to remember that there’s no such thing as completely safe. The FDA’s approval process recognizes this once-common sense understanding of the world: anything can kill you, and what might be safe for you might kill somebody else. Drugs have to be shown not to be too dangerous, since if it were required to prove a drug was completely safe, no new drugs would ever be approved. It’s logically impossible to prove anything completely safe, so reasonably safe is the goal, for some value of reasonably.

Only once proven ‘safe’ is it tested to see if it actually does anything. Once it is shown to be reasonably safe and to do something positive, it gets approved. ‘Something positive’ is, again, a judgement call. No amount of testing can prove cause and effect, but it can prove really high correlation. Antibiotics seem to correlate very well with recovery from certain infections, for example. (Antibiotics also kill or maim some small percentage of users, but the risk has been determined to be worth the benefit.)

This FDA testing process simply must take years. You test your drug on lab animals – and WAIT to see if there are bad effects. You then test it on people – and WAIT again! If you don’t wait, you are simply failing to test mid-term and long-term effects. To repeat: if you don’t test FOR YEARS you simply are NOT TESTING FOR MID-TERM AND LONG TERM PROBLEMS. Then, once you’ve demonstrated an acceptable level of safety, you can test to see if it works. (1)

That’s why Moderna, which has been around for 11 years, had NO, as in ZERO, as in NADA, products on the market prior to getting their COVID drug approved for use – with about 3 months of testing. Because their drug and similar drugs were not tested for mid-term and long-term side effects, drug companies demanded immunity from damages for all side effects – which the government granted to them. You, if you get vaccinated, are agreeing to this – the drug companies cannot be sued for damages if you experience side effects, even if they cripple or kill you. Side effects have not been tested for – given the limited amount of time devoted to testing, they simply cannot have been.

Prior to getting their COVID drug approved on an emergency basis, Moderna had losses of $1.5B, and returned nothing to a lot of high-profile investors, who have $3.5B invested in the company. Now? They made $803M in 2020, which I’m sure they’ve exceeded handily this year already. AND work is well underway to sell the notion of the need for boosters – forever. Similar situations prevail at other ‘vaccine’ makers using the novel, experimental mRNA approach.

Similarly, mid and long term effectiveness simply CANNOT have been tested for. All that it is possible to know is effectiveness over some period of time no longer than the testing period. That – and the economics involved – is why it is now being ‘discovered’ that vaccinated people are going to need booster shots effectively forever. Nice work if you can get it.

The take-aways:

  1. Nothing in this life is ‘safe’. Aspirin kills and cripples people; so do peanuts and shellfish. Drug testing is merely designed to gather data for a cost/benefit analysis. Anyone who tells you something is ‘completely safe’ is lying his hindquarters off.
  2. Drug testing developed over the last 90 years in response to drugs killing and maiming people.
  3. Testing got more and more rigorous as drugs such as thalidomide proved to having terrible effects in some cases.
  4. Current FDA approval for a new drug requires about 10 years and in the neighborhood of a billion dollars worth of testing
  5. If years are not spent testing a drug, it is simply impossible to discover any mid and long term side effects. Drugs that have been tested for a matter of months have unknown mid and long term effects.
  6. Drug companies demanded and got immunity from being sued for any effects from these ‘vaccines’. Drug companies cannot be sued for any bad effects resulting from these drugs.
  7. Long term effectiveness of the drugs is unknown, but is currently being found to be short, as in 4 months or so in some cases.

Still think it’s a good idea to get vaccinated against a disease that, in its current form, harms less than 0.01% of its victims?

  1. Drug companies are highly motivated to find further uses for drugs that have already been approved. They can skip directly to the ‘does something positive’ stage of testing – saving years and hundreds of millions of dollars. That’s why you see, sometimes, drugs approved for use in treating a bewildering array of illnesses. This whole testing routine is also why Big Pharma has been fined many billions of dollars for falsifying results. (note: this list only includes stuff they couldn’t bribe their way out of, reality being what it is.) If the drug doesn’t actually do anything, you’re out a lot of cash and a decade of testing, so tweak a study here, lie through statistics there…
  2. My late oldest sister was a patent chaser for a (since merged out of existence) pharmaceutical company. A patent chaser tries to find any pertinent already-existing patents that might limit the ability of the drug maker to secure their rights and cash in, and also helps write up the new patent applications to avoid stepping on any existing claims. It takes high levels of technical competence in biochemistry and law. My sister was a sharp gal.

Author: Joseph Moore

Enough with the smarty-pants Dante quote. Just some opinionated blogger dude.

3 thoughts on “Testing for Real (yes, the d*mn virus)”

  1. We are living in a sea of superstitious savages. If you think that cotton is magic, why not insist that something tested for ~ year is known to be safe and effective mid- and long-term.

  2. Really good background on Moderna. I haven’t read that anywhere. Scoundrels. $803b?(!!) And today, Walmart and Disney announce all employees must be vaxxed. Insidious. Horrific! Evil is rampant.

    Just curious on how you learned this info. I’d love to share more broadly. Like with my boss–who only believes MSM.

    Good for your sister! And shame on big pharma!

    1. The Wikipedia link for Moderna has the financial information and the history of their lack of products. The $803M – million, not billion – in income in 2020 is reported because Moderna is a publicly-held corporation and must report earnings; I haven’t checked to see if any 2021 income has been reported yet, but since the vax insanity only was just getting started in 2020, I’d assume it’s a much bigger number in 2021.

      Your tax dollars at work.

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