Odd Lenten Hymns

In the comments to the last post, J. J. Griffing asked for examples of the sort of traditional Lenten hymns that are out of vogue in my little corner of the world, tunes which I find a little odd, but also miss. The oddness consists of two factors: dirge-like hymn tunes, and graphic descriptions of suffering and penance often described in archaic language. Some hymns have one, some the other, some both. Here goes:

Forty Days and Forty Nights

Forty days and forty nights
Thou wast fasting in the wild;
Forty days and forty nights
Tempted, and yet undefiled.

Sunbeams scorching all the day;
Chilly dew-drops nightly shed;
Prowling beasts about Thy way;
Stones Thy pillow; earth Thy bed.

Should not we Thy sorrow share
And from worldly joys abstain,
Fasting with unceasing prayer,
Strong with Thee to suffer pain?

Then if Satan on us press,
Jesus, Savior, hear our call!
Victor in the wilderness,
Grant we may not faint nor fall!

So shall we have peace divine:
Holier gladness ours shall be;
Round us, too, shall angels shine,
Such as ministered to Thee.

Keep, O keep us, Savior dear,
Ever constant by Thy side;
That with Thee we may appear
At the eternal Eastertide.

The tune here is very much a dirge, and the lyrics speak for themselves. I like it! Hymnody.org has this to say to say about the composer: George Hunt Smyttan. The tune is attributed to Martin Herbst, who died in 1681. Other verses have been added by other poets over the years, generally with the same flavor.

Here’s a cheerier tune:

The Glory of These Forty Days

  1. The glory of these forty days
    we celebrate with songs of praise,
    for Christ, through whom all things were made,
    himself has fasted and has prayed.
  2. Alone and fasting Moses saw
    the loving God who gave the law,
    and to Elijah, fasting, came
    the steeds and chariots of flame.
  3. So Daniel trained his mystic sight,
    delivered from the lions’ might,
    and John, the Bridegroom’s friend, became
    the herald of Messiah’s name.
  4. Then grant us, Lord, like them to be
    full oft in fast and prayer with thee;
    our spirits strengthen with thy grace,
    and give us joy to see thy face.
  5. O Father, Son and Spirit blest,
    to thee be every prayer addressed,
    who art in threefold name adored,
    from age to age, the only Lord.

This is great song, good tune, nice lyrics. Tune can go down the dirge road, although a musician with any sensibility would sing it at a decent tempo with a slight lilt, saving it from being a wade through molasses.

Honorable mentions include Lord, Who Throughout These Forty Days, which always cracks me up – the Lord doing a little clean up, tossing an extra 40 days that were cluttering up the place, and the classic and wonderful O Sacred Head Surrounded, which does get sung, but usually just on Good Friday. Now those are some graphic lyrics.

Stuff just came up. This will have to do for now.

Author: Joseph Moore

Enough with the smarty-pants Dante quote. Just some opinionated blogger dude.

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